Tags: space | fast radio burst | outer space | astronomy

Second Mysterious Fast Radio Burst Detected in Space

an artistic rendering of a satellite in deep space
(NASA/AP)

By | Thursday, 10 January 2019 05:11 PM

More mysterious fast radio bursts have been detected from outer space by a telescope in Canada, including a few bursts that stem from the exact same location in the sky, according to a study published in the journal Nature.

Fast radio bursts are brief pulses of radio waves coming from far outside our Milky Way galaxy, flaring with the power of about 500 million suns. Until now, there was only one known repeating fast radio burst, said Ingrid Stairs, an astrophysicist at the University of British Columbia.

"Knowing that there is another suggests that there could be more out there. And with more repeaters and more sources available for study, we may be able to understand these cosmic puzzles – where they're from and what causes them," said Stairs, an author on the study.

Astronomers recorded 13 FRBs from a galaxy 1.5 billion light years away using the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, a radio telescope designed by a collaboration of scientists from Harvard University, MIT, University of British Columbia, Space Science Institute and The University of Toronto among others.

The data presented in the study was collected over a period of only three weeks during the summer of 2018 when CHIME was in its "precommissioning phase and running at only a fraction of its full capacity," per MIT.

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For the second time in history, mysterious fast radio bursts have been detected from outer space by a telescope in Canada, according to a study reported in the Nature journal.
space, fast radio burst, outer space, astronomy
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2019-11-10
Thursday, 10 January 2019 05:11 PM
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